Survey Reveals Designing For Happiness And Health Is More Essential Than Ever

WARROAD — Marvin, a leader in designing for well-being in home building and remodeling, continues to reinforce the notion that happiness in the home is more important than ever. As we close out 2020, the company unveils findings from a new survey, “Designing for Happiness at Home,” and shows the home is an essential happiness driver, ranking second on Americans’ list of things that contributes to their state of happiness – equal to their physical health and just one point behind the health of their family. With uncertainty still weighing on peoples’ minds, one thing is clear: the home must be a comforting sanctuary as people continue to stay indoors.

“Designing for Happiness at Home,” a survey conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Marvin, shows that more than 9 out of 10 homeowners want to feel happy, comfortable, and relaxed (96 percent) in their space. To achieve this, nearly 3 out of 5 homeowners (58 percent) are planning renovations within the next three months. Millennials lead the renovation pack and say they are not afraid to spend for happiness. This generation plans to tackle various-sized home projects such as upgrading appliances, adding more natural light, and increasing square footage to their spaces.

“Our homes have become our true refuge, the places where we spend the most time and an important piece of the way people are feeling. Understanding how the home impacts our moods and productivity means understanding the benefits of natural light, views to the outside world, and comforting spaces to gather with family,” says Christine Marvin, VP of design at Marvin. “Many of us are still telecommuting and virtually learning from home, so it’s more important than ever to have spaces that help promote happiness and overall physical and emotional health, whether we are working, living, or sleeping. We conducted this survey to learn about what helps people thrive at home and how we can act on our purpose of imagining and creating better ways of living for homeowners today.”

He Said, She Said on Light
Daylight Saving Time ends on Nov. 1 and much of the United States will experience longer, darker days. The shift in time and the amount of natural light may impact energy level and mood, making people—especially women—feel more tired and less productive.

Women are more likely to say natural light has a positive effect on sleep patterns and productivity, when compared to men (83 percent of women agree vs. 76 percent of men). They also say they struggle to wake up in the morning when it’s still dark out (67 percent vs. 54 percent) and fall asleep if is too bright (55 percent vs. 41 percent) as opposed to men.

Sight, Air, and Sound Aid in Well-being
Homeowners often consult with builders or architects when it comes to in-home wellness. More than half (58 percent) of builders and almost half (48 percent) of architects surveyed said homeowners either often or always ask specifically for items to improve their health and happiness in the home. And when it comes to feeling happy in the home, natural light and outdoor views of nature/greenery or the world around them top the list.

But it’s not just what they see in their space that makes them happy, it’s also what they hear and the air they breathe. Quiet atmospheres and indoor air quality are other elements to which people pay attention to achieve respite in the home. For example, air circulation and outside noises are two factors people consider (95 and 92 percent respectively), especially when purchasing a new home. Light emerged as a top need that people will put their spending power behind, as 77 percent of people are willing to pay more for natural sunlight.

Marvin’s Commitment to Well-being
With Nordic roots and a headquarters in one of the northernmost cities in the continental U.S., Marvin is uniquely positioned to understand the important role of natural light, air, and views when it comes to well-being. Aligning with the Nordic design tenet of hygge and inspired by friluftsliv, a concept that embraces getting fresh air for well-being, Marvin designers create products to help homeowners live better by harnessing the power of light, air, and views.

Marvin is currently re-investing 3-5 percent of its revenue into developing revolutionary new products designed to help people live better. Two recent launches that embody this mission and support survey results about the things people want and need in their home are the Marvin Skycove, a glass alcove that pops out to allow better connection with nature and more natural light, and the Marvin Awaken Skylight, a smart skylight offering more efficient airflow and tunable, supplemental LED lighting. Both were developed in the company’s new Design Lab following extensive research by various professionals in the industry, homeowners, sleep scientists, and Danish hygge experts. Skycove and the Awaken Skylight deliver on the company’s promise to imagine and create better ways of living, giving homeowners new ways of connecting to and experiencing their homes.

The “Designing for Happiness at Home” survey was conducted online in August 2020 on behalf of Marvin by The Harris Poll among more than 1,300 people in the U.S. consisting of homeowners, builders, architects, and designers. A flash poll was also conducted online in April 2020 on behalf of Marvin by The Harris Poll among more than 1,000 U.S. adults ages 18 and older.

For more information on Marvin’s products that support happier, healthier living, please visit marvin.com/comingsoon.

About Marvin
Marvin is a fourth-generation family-owned and -operated business headquartered in Warroad, Minnesota, with more than 5,500 employees across 16 cities in North America. The Marvin portfolio of products for builders, architects and homeowners is designed to provide exceptional solutions for any project with a focus on creating better ways of living. Marvin products are distributed nationally through a network of independent dealers and are also exported internationally. Visit marvin.com to learn more.

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